The Art of Fermenting Fruit
Wine & Mead Making Tips & Recipe's from around the world

Blogs

Sparkling Apple Pineapple Cider-Mead

OK, so it's been awhile since I've tried anything new. I've been wanting to do an apple cider so why not.

After doing a little searching and letting my mind wander a little, I came up with this recipe


Sparkling Apple Cider Mead

6 Litres Organic Apple Juice - Pressed, not from concentrate.
Specific Gravity of juice is 1.050

1 can pineaple tidbits with juice 540 ml Tossed in blender
1 litre spring water
5 1/2 Cups Honey
1 Tsp Jamaican Allspice

specific gravity is 1.100 pot alc of about 13%.

Sparkeloid as a clarifying agent

I tried this stuff the other day and was quite amazed.
I had a batch opf Cranberry Mead which was really being difficult. Clarification was just not happening and it had been sitting for several months already. In a last ditch attempt to clarify this Mead, I picked up some Sparkeloid, which as far as I'm concerned is Mud, well clay, but I will call it mud.

Tender Coconut wine process patented in India

KOCHI: Coconut farmers in Kerala, hit by falling prices and pests, may find solace in the Maharashtra model of wine tourism. A farmer in Kasargod district, who invented the technology to make wine from tender coconuts, thinks the invention would help his peers tide over the recurring crop crisis if the state government opens up its wine sector as in Maharashtra, where grape farmers are free to make and market wine.

Sparkling Peach wine - The original Bellini

Peach has a great significance in different cultures. It can be of different colors such as red, yellow, pink, white or a blend of these colors. The tradition of making peach wine is popular in many countries. The Bellini is an Italian sparkling peach wine, which was believed to originate during 1930s at Harry’s Bar in Venice. It was named after a famous opera composer.

The story of wine since 3500 B.C.

Here is an interesting little article on the history of wine. I also remember reading something awhile back which stated there was reference to mead in prehistoric "caveman" days where honey dripped into puddles and fermented. A little bit muddy for my tastes but back then they figured it was some nectar from the gods.... Kinda makes sense in a caveman sort of way.

Blackberry Almond Pulque - My first stab at it

2 cups ground almonds
1 tsp Jamaican all-spice

Put in double boiler with 4 cups of water
Boiled for 1 hour
I filtered out the almond muck and

Added

4 Cups previously frozen pressed blackberry juice
6 Cups blue Agave Nectar
1 Cup honey
and remainder of water to make up 2 Imperial Gallons (8 Litres)

Specific gravity was at 1.085

The almond wine recipe said to let the must sit for a day prior to adding the yeast, so that is what I am doing.

See you tomorrow (OK, I must be loosing it now)

Blackberry Almond Pulque - My first stab at it

OK, a few days ago I stumbled on a question in another wine making forum which related to Pulque. Not knowing what Pulque was and being mildly interested, I did a search. It turns out Pulque is the pre-curser to Tequila and is often referred to as Agave Mead (Agave being the suculent used for making tequila).

Not being one to walk away from something interesting I did abit more reading and came up with this little combo recipe. Actually, I was going to make Blackberry Almond Mead, but as I was getting it ready, my shipment of Blue Agave Nectar came in.

So here it is

Blackberry Almond Pulque - My first stab at it

OK, a few days ago I stumbled on a question in another wine making forum which related to Pulque. Not knowing what Pulque was and being mildly interested, I did a search. It turns out Pulque is the pre-curser to Tequila and is often referred to as Aguave Mead (Aguave being the suculent used for making tequila).

Not being one to walk away from something interesting I did abit more reading and came up with this little combo recipe. Actually, I was going to make Blackberry Almond Mead, but as I was getting it ready, my shipment of Blue Agave Nectar came in.

So here it is

Step by step

Probably one of the better step by step instructional articles I have found. Aside from the use of Campden, I figure this is definately worth a read.

Cheers,

Heinz

by Alison Crowe

Wine Making - The Flavors Of Wine

Just another mooched article from the net.

Although the four main flavors sweet, salty, sour, and bitter are all your tongue is really capable of tasting, the long lasting impression that wine leaves in your mouth is far more complex. When you drink or taste wine, your taste buds and your sense of smell are involved, adding to the way you interpret wine overall. The flavors, aromas, and sensations that wine is comprised of provide the interaction that you taste when you sample wine.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - blogs

Search Google